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Huthwaite Summit – 20th Anniversary

The Huthwaite Innovation Institute’s Annual Mackinac Island summit is in its 20th year.  The dates are August 13 through 15, 2013.  This unique gathering brings together a select group of top executives for two and a half days of networking and work group sessions designed to foster the exchange of ideas and innovations covering the top obstacles implementing  designs that are lean corporate wide. Executives will have the opportunity to further establish best practices for design through peer collaboration and executive education in a fun and relaxed environment.

At the end of the summit, you will know how to:

  • Make innovation a sustainable management process, rather than a random event
  • Integrate innovation into your existing continuous improvement initiatives
  • Measure whether you are on the right track early enough to make course corrections
  • Use innovation to find new market opportunitiesMackinac Island Sunset
  • Apply innovation to improve your day-to-day business operations.
  • Get all ‘stakeholders’ on board from Day One. . . and keep them on board
  • Systematically go outside your corporate boundaries to discover new ideas
  • Enable teams to innovate without creating chaos, delay, and low morale

Benefits of Attending:

Participation will enable the implementation of lean techniques for design within your organization.   Participants will hear powerful “lessons learned” from other companies and will have the opportunity to share their successes and obstacles. We will discuss the greatest challenges implementing and lean system, and how companies are addressing those issues.

Learning Cycles and Rapid Prototyping Ironman style

 
 
 

  

Tony Stark tests his prototype suit

 

A rapid learning cycle calls for rapid prototyping methods.  Inside of a rapid learning cycle, an innovator creates multiple design options, and then builds and tests the prototypes.  Developing prototypes helps to eliminate the risks in development.  Although, in the case of Tony Stark’s test flight, we all realize that he should have spent a little more time analyzing the risks before taking off in his Ironman suit.  

As an illustration of rapid prototyping, consider the prototype shop that Tony Stark builds in his Malibu beachfront house.  Here he can build prototypes on his Bridgeport milling machine, use sophisticated 3D computer software, and give commands to his smart robots.  

Robotics

 

Tony uses the workshop to create rapidly evolving versions of his IronMan suits.   His workshop is basically a rapid prototyping set-up where he can create anything from the IronMan suits to a particle accelerator.   In IronMan II, Tony digitized the model city created by his father (digital wireframes of existing objects is a technology that exists today), and then creates a full 3D model, which unlocks the secrets handed down from his father to a key new element which not only will increase the power of his suit, but save his life.  

 Tony Stark has all the technology he needs to build a small-scale particle accelerator to generate the new element for his power supply, the arc reactor.  Sound impossible to build a particle accelerate in just a few days?  Well, it is the movies after all.  Tony even uses Captain America’s shield to level out one section of the accelerator tube!  Now that is a rough, quick, and effective use of prototyping (plus a little drama and foreshadowing of future movies thrown into the mix)!  

This is a great movie and very entertaining.  The movie shows what a rapid prototyping shop of the future might look like!  

Timothy.