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Learning Cycles and Rapid Prototyping Ironman style

 
 
 

  

Tony Stark tests his prototype suit

 

A rapid learning cycle calls for rapid prototyping methods.  Inside of a rapid learning cycle, an innovator creates multiple design options, and then builds and tests the prototypes.  Developing prototypes helps to eliminate the risks in development.  Although, in the case of Tony Stark’s test flight, we all realize that he should have spent a little more time analyzing the risks before taking off in his Ironman suit.  

As an illustration of rapid prototyping, consider the prototype shop that Tony Stark builds in his Malibu beachfront house.  Here he can build prototypes on his Bridgeport milling machine, use sophisticated 3D computer software, and give commands to his smart robots.  

Robotics

 

Tony uses the workshop to create rapidly evolving versions of his IronMan suits.   His workshop is basically a rapid prototyping set-up where he can create anything from the IronMan suits to a particle accelerator.   In IronMan II, Tony digitized the model city created by his father (digital wireframes of existing objects is a technology that exists today), and then creates a full 3D model, which unlocks the secrets handed down from his father to a key new element which not only will increase the power of his suit, but save his life.  

 Tony Stark has all the technology he needs to build a small-scale particle accelerator to generate the new element for his power supply, the arc reactor.  Sound impossible to build a particle accelerate in just a few days?  Well, it is the movies after all.  Tony even uses Captain America’s shield to level out one section of the accelerator tube!  Now that is a rough, quick, and effective use of prototyping (plus a little drama and foreshadowing of future movies thrown into the mix)!  

This is a great movie and very entertaining.  The movie shows what a rapid prototyping shop of the future might look like!  

Timothy.  

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